The Civil War, Day by Day

Jackson at Antietam (detail)


Port Hudson Surrenders

The siege had taken its toll on both the Northern and Southern armies. The tired and hungry Union soldiers had exhausted their food rations and tobacco supply; they were making cigars out of sumac leaves and meals from mules and rodents. Some foreign-born Northern soldiers chose comfort over patriotism and snuck away to camps which offered better provisions.

Once Confederate General Gardner surrendered the port, a Southern soldier marveled that fighters on both sides, “swarmed from their places of concealment…and met each other in the most cordial and fraternal spirit. One could hardly believe it is possible these men had just before been fighting with the ferocity of tigers.” The Confederate recalled that a surgeon from the Union side, “came in during a heavy rainstorm and brought medicines to our sick, repeating his visit the next morning.”

The fall of Port Hudson was a landmark event in the Civil War. It was the last Confederate port along the Mississippi River…and the Union’s final obstacle to the waterway. The North had captured more than 6,000 soldiers and a substantial supply of ammunition and arms.

Mort Künstler painted this dramatic battle scene, a detail from Jackson at Antietam, which typifies the fighting which took place at Port Hudson.





August's Archived Features:

Saturday August 1, 2020
Sunday August 2, 2020
Monday August 3, 2020
Tuesday August 4, 2020
Wednesday August 5, 2020
Thursday August 6, 2020
Friday August 7, 2020
Saturday August 8, 2020
Sunday August 9, 2020
Monday August 10, 2020
Tuesday August 11, 2020
Wednesday August 12, 2020
Thursday August 13, 2020
Friday August 14, 2020

 

 

 
All illustrations by Mort Künstler. Text by Michael Aubrecht, Dee Brown, Henry Steele Commager, Rod Gragg, Mort Künstler, Edward Lengel, James McPherson, and James I. Robertson, Jr. - Copyright © 2001-2019. All Rights Reserved. No part of the contents of this web site may be reproduced or utilized in any form by any means without written consent of the artist.