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The Art of Mort Künstler / The Gallery Store / Limited Edition Prints / /



Remember Me
Fredericksburg, Virginia November 30, 1862


Quantity:
Option:
Paper Artist's Proof - $600.00



 


LIMITED EDITION PRINTS

Paper Prints
Reproduction technique: Fine offset lithography on neutral pH archival quality paper using the finest fade-resistant inks.
Each print is numbered and signed by the artist and accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity.


Paper Signed and Numbered
Image Size: 18 3/4" x 29" • Overall Size: 23 1/2" x 33" • Edition Size: 3000
Paper Artist's Proof
Image Size: 18 3/4" x 29" • Overall Size: 23 1/2" x 33" • Edition Size: 150



Mort Künstler’s Comments:

Every time I visit Fredericksburg I marvel at the beauty of the city. Inspired by a recent visit, I decided to do another painting of Princess Anne Street. By moving up the street further north from the viewpoint of my painting, Lee at Fredericksburg, I was able to feature St. George's Episcopal Church again, and in a more prominent role. I was able to show the wonderful cast iron fence that surrounds the Presbyterian Church diagonally across from St. George's and also feature the National Bank of Fredericksburg on the other corner. This building was a bank even during the Civil War and is a very famous landmark. The lights in the upstairs windows of the bank illuminate an apartment used by the head cashier and his family during the war. Both Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis gave speeches on the steps of this building at different times. Lincoln spoke at the side entrance, while Davis made his speech from the front steps on Princess Anne Street. St. George's was built in 1849. The central tower and steeple, long a familiar city landmark, have survived the ravages of time and war. The clock in the tower was set in place in 1850 by the City of Fredericksburg, which is still responsible for its maintenance. Not until the end of the 19th century did stained glass church windows become popular. During the Civil War the windows were diamond shaped, as shown. To depict Fredericksburg before it was damaged by battle, I consulted drawings done by E. Sachs and Co. of Baltimore in 1856. Using the beautiful city of Fredericksburg as a backdrop, I have painted a scene acted out thousands of times throughout the land: a soldier saying goodbye, knowing it may be for the last time.


 

 
All illustrations by Mort Künstler. Text by Michael Aubrecht, Dee Brown, Henry Steele Commager, Rod Gragg, Mort Künstler, James McPherson, and James I. Robertson, Jr. - Copyright © 2001-2011. All Rights Reserved. No part of the contents of this web site may be reproduced or utilized in any form by any means without written consent of the artist.