Art Showcase

If you experience any problems placing your order online, please call 800-850-1776 to order by phone.

The Art of Mort Künstler / The American Spirit / Coming of Age

Here you will find a pictorial chronicle of the drama and excitement of American History. These paintings give the viewer an insight into the tumultuous life of this young nation that mere words cannot achieve.



Stroud Farm - limited edition print - SOLD OUT
Hutchinson, Kansas, 1917




Overall Size: 22” x 28”
Edition Size: 2000



Mort Künstler's Comments:

My painting depicts the Stroud family farm in Hutchinson, Kansas in the fall of 1917. The waterboy in the foreground is Vaden Stroud, the owner of the farm when I painted this scene in 1976. He was a farmer, retired teacher, historian, collector of antique cars and farm equipment, raconteur, gentleman and a good friend. He was one of the experts I consulted while working on this painting.

The model who posed for the farmer in the foreground taking a drink of water was Sam Kriebel, another farmer, collector, expert on antique engines and also a good friend. Sam owned a dairy farm in Mainland, Pennsylvania, and the J.I. Case engine that served as the model for the one depicted in the painting. It is a 1917 40 horsepower steam traction engine. This particular Case tractor was used in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania to thresh wheat in the summer and fall, and to power a saw mill during the winter.

The Model T Ford shown is a 1915 Touring Car, a very popular model with all farmers during that era. The model for the wagon, in the background to the left of the thresher, being loaded with wheat was still in service, owned by an Amish family in Yoder, Kansas.

In the far background to the right is the water wagon. It supplied the engine with water and coal. It is very much like the "Red River Special" I saw and sketched in a museum in Minden, Nebraska.

The prevailing winds in Kansas are from the South or Southwest. We see by the smoke and direction of the windmill in the far background that we are looking to the Northeast late in the afternoon as a storm moves Eastward. The thresher, a Case, was always set up downwind from the steam engines so the straw or "chaff" would not blow back onto the machines or men.

Date Created: 1976

 

 
All illustrations by Mort Künstler. Text by Michael Aubrecht, Dee Brown, Henry Steele Commager, Rod Gragg, Mort Künstler, Edward Lengel, James McPherson, and James I. Robertson, Jr. - Copyright © 2001-2018. All Rights Reserved. No part of the contents of this web site may be reproduced or utilized in any form by any means without written consent of the artist.